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  • Iraqi commandos training under the supervision of soldiers from the US 82nd Airborne in December 2010.
  • On-line map sales raise more than $250,000 to preserve more maps
  • If the authors of a recently published book have their way, “keeping up with the Joneses” may have more to do with who has the cheapest utility bills than who’s got the biggest house.
  • Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Elvis, Recruiting and Retention Battalion Command sergeant major, South Carolina Army National Guard, looks at pictures from his deployment to Operation Just Cause in Panama in 1989. courtesy photo
  • 1941 – World War II: First battle of the American Volunteer Group, better known as the "Flying Tigers" in Kunming, China. The 1st American Volunteer Group (AVG) of the Chinese Air Force in 1941–1942, nicknamed the Flying Tigers, was composed of pilots from the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC), recruited under presidential authority and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault. The ground crew and headquarters staff were likewise mostly recruited from the U.S. military, along with some civilians. The group consisted of three fighter squadrons with about 30 aircraft each. It trained in Burma before the American entry into World War II with the mission of defending China against Japanese forces. The group of volunteers were officially members of the Chinese Air Force. The members of the group had contracts with salaries ranging from $250 a month for a mechanic to $750 for a squadron commander, roughly three times what they had been making in the U.S. forces. The Tigers' shark-faced fighters remain among the most recognizable of any individual combat aircraft and combat unit of World War II, and they demonstrated innovative tactical victories when the news in the U.S. was filled with little more than stories of defeat at the hands of the Japanese forces. The group first saw combat on 20 December 1941, 12 days after Pearl Harbor (local time). It achieved notable success during the lowest period of the war for U.S. and Allied Forces, giving hope to Americans that they would eventually succeed against the Japanese. They are officially credited with 296 enemy aircraft destroyed.
  • Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter drug worldwide, added to the healthy lifespan of yeast, worms and flies in a recent study. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips)