Front Page
  • This colorful Pitt biplane is one of several aircraft already at Jones Field in preparation for Bonham Festival of Flight on Saturday. photo by Allen Rich
  • USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Fannin Soil and Water Conservation District would like to invite the public to come and meet the new District Conservationist for the Bonham Field Office, Kalissa Garland.
  • The 15th annual 'Roo Boo at Austin College, hosted by the local chapter of Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity, will be held Wednesday, October 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. in Sid Richardson Center of the Robert T. Mason Athletic-Recreation Complex, off Brockett Street and just east of the football stadium. The event is held earlier than usual this fall due to Homecoming activities on the campus October 30 and 31.
  • The Bonham Independent School District selected the Fannin County Family Crisis Center as the recipient of the 2014 Homecoming community donation. The donation only gate admission for the junior varsity and varsity football games during the week of Homecoming brought in over $6,000 for the Crisis Center. Accepting the check were Melody Michaud (Board President), Carol Pillars, Becky Williams (Executive Director), Sue Agnew, Teffany Kavanaugh, Jo Ransom, Tere Curtis, and Bonham Police Chief Mike Bankston.
  • Stunning exhibitions of samurai armor and avant-garde fashion
  • 1861 – The First Transcontinental Telegraph line across the United States is completed, spelling the end for the 18-month-old Pony Express. The first transcontinental telegraph (completed in 1861) was a line that connected an existing network in the eastern United States to a small network in California by a link between Omaha and Carson City via Salt Lake City. It was a milestone in electrical engineering and in the formation of the United States of America. It served as the only method of near-instantaneous communication between the east and west coasts during the 1860s. The telegraph line immediately made the Pony Express obsolete, and it officially ceased operations two days later. The overland telegraph line was operated until 1869, when it was replaced by a multi-line telegraph that had been constructed alongside the route of the Transcontinental Railroad.