Columnists
  • When my mother was lying in ICU after by-pass surgery years ago, she was hooked up and connected to a myriad of machines, screens, pumps, and vials. Clear tubes protruded from every orifice---some were carrying fluid in, while others carried fluid out. Most of the fluid was clear, except for the dark orange one near the floor. As she lay there still under sedation, my dad said to me: "I believe if your mother could get her hair done she'd perk right up."
  • Remember when Alaska was admitted to the USA as our 49th state? I was in high school at the time, and the main thing I remember was the gleeful boast by Alaskans that Texas would no longer be the biggest state. When I got to Texas A&M the next year, the standing joke was that if all the ice in Alaska were melted, Texas would again be the biggest.
  • Associate professor of Communication at Texas A&M, Jennifer Mercieca, defines this word of Greek origin: "to say publically things one can later disavow without being responsible for one's previous statement." Insinuation and innuendo appear to be verbal first cousins.
  • Our nation pays - by far - the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs. As a result, nearly one in five Americans cannot afford to fill their prescriptions. That is unacceptable. A lifesaving product does no good if patients cannot afford it.
  • To understand what is happening in Libya today, we don't have to go back to Phoenician trading posts.
  • Except for Texas, 95% of the pickup trucks on the road have nothing to do with a job. They are a status symbol due to marketing. When you travel outside of the Lone Star State, most every pickemuptruck is empty. They love the empty truck. It's a wonderment why anyone would want such a primitive vehicle for daily use, but in those states it is all about cup holders and sitting up high. It has nothing to do with driving performance. In Texas, we don't see a pickup truck as a status symbol. That belongs to Ferrari, Lamborghini, Aston Martin, and Porsche.
  • One person's dream is another's nightmare; but ironically, many of the "Bernie or bust" Democrats have the same issues with our corporately-controlled system as do the "Trump only" Republicans.
  • One of these sports that can maim and cripple a person is bungee jumping. A bungee cord is attached to a bridge or a tower and people simply put the loop around their waists and jump off. If they don't smash their brains out, they do it again. Sometimes they pay as much as $80 for the thrill.
  • Having lived only one-third of the USA's history, I cannot speak for most past elections, but I do believe that 2016 presents the starkest contrasts we have yet seen between our major parties.
  • If you like speeches, the Presidential National Conventions were for you. One speaker, who shall remain unnamed, couldn't electrify a kiddie pool if he threw a toaster in it. Now that the Democratic and Republican Conventions are over, both sets of candidates will race frantically around the United States for the next few months, grasping voters' hands and telling them---with all the sincerity of a guy in a bar declaring his love to a woman he met three drinks earlier---how deeply they care about New Jersey, Oregon, Delaware, Wyoming, or whatever state their motorcade just entered.
  • Since the United States' foreign policy always includes the idea of fostering democracy globally, we should look at a few cases where "democratically-run elections," internationally monitored or not, did not always bring democracy.
  • Humans are masters of the ridiculous. Years ago KLM Royal Dutch Airlines made an offer the world could refuse. For $80 you could board one of their planes and go wherever it happened to be going and ride it back again without ever getting off. Their PR man was obviously overmedicated.