Columnists
  • In the discussions over what to do about our Confederate statue on the grounds of our Grayson County Courthouse, voices appear to fall into two camps: 1) take it down and put it on the grounds of a museum; or 2) leave it alone as a part of our history.
  • A visitor passed by the bookshop on Not 4th Street while it and I were there. He was spare - of stature, humor, and wit - and he had much to say, but only on one topic.
  • If you’re wondering if I went to my 50th class reunion, the answer is yes. I "went" every time I took a step.
  • It appears we have a knowledge gap among younger workers when it comes to Social Security. Recent analysis from the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) shows a quarter of younger workers believe that Social Security will not be part of their income in retirement. This compares with 13% of those over 45 who believe the same thing.
  • "Everything would be considered a miracle were it to occur but once," said someone very smart very foolishly. We, all of us, seek and must find an echo, resonance. The name for a new world every moment is dementia.
  • The invasion of France on June 6, 1944 was a triumph of intelligence, coordination, secrecy, and planning. The bold attack, using 4,000 ships, 11,000 planes, and nearly 3,000,000 soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors was also a tremendous risk in facing the highly-defended and well-prepared enemy. Ultimately, the invasion succeeded because of individual soldiers’ bravery in combat. Charles E. Davidson, Jr., of Deport, Texas, was one of those Army soldiers and today he is a humble, yet passionate, veteran of World War II.
  • Al Capone, the infamous mob boss and bootlegger in Chicagoland during the 1920s, always maintained that he was just a businessman, saying the only difference between him and others was that the law criminalized his business, while legalizing the criminality of so-called "legitimate" businessmen.
  • We're talking mosquitos, not ex-wives. Male mosquitoes do not bite. Only females bite because they need the protein in blood to produce eggs. One species of mosquitoes, only one, doesn’t need blood for reproduction. The others will bite anything with corpuscles - birds, humans, and animals, warm or cold blooded, even lawyers and telemarketers - in order to get a blood meal.
  • "Here's a good example of a trade blank," says National Park Ranger Marten Schmitz, as he bends down to retrieve a palm sized chunk of Alibates (pronounced AL-eh-bates) flint rock from the dried shortgrass prairie. The flint is a beautifully colored red and white and as Schmitz explains, was prized as a currency for people who lived in this region as far back as 13,000 years ago.
  • My intention was to comment on Rachel Dolezal’s feeling that she was black; then emerged a cartoon by Toles depicting a McKinney (Texas) policeman sitting on a black teenager’s back at a pool party. Another policeman standing nearby warns: “Be careful, it’s possible she’s just pretending that she is black!” The day after, I marveled at the controversy over who should be on the new US currency to celebrate the past century of women having the right to vote. Should it be a famous black woman? Why not, even if black women and men could not vote in 1920!
  • Washington's gossip mill is spinning furiously over the recent revelations about Dennis Hastert's long hidden sexual molestation scandal. But what about the filthy, backroom affair he's been openly conducting with corporate lobbyists for nearly two decades?
  • Fifty years ago, just over a hundred of us crossed the auditorium stage and received our high school diplomas. It dawned on us that night that the unfortunate, yet truly exciting thing about our lives was that there would be no core curriculum. We faced an entire world of electives. Later we would learn that we never had more energy, enthusiasm, hair, or brain cells than we did when we sang the school song for the last time.