Columnists
  • Today was a day of rejoicing as my dentist replaced the scruffy temporary bridge in my mouth with one that was surely designed and crafted by an origami artisan in Japan. This slick and shiny permanent bridge is such a relief, since my teeth felt like they were wearing socks for three weeks.
  • Are you tired of the hustle and bustle of the daily grind? Tired of dealing with the myriad of minor and not so minor intrusions that wear your nerves and produce the feeling that you'll never catch up? Well so am I. That's why I say, "Give me the simple life."
  • The founder of the Mother's Day holiday in the United States was Anna Marie Jarvis (1864-1948), and her task was not an easy one. It was first celebrated in 1908, when Jarvis held a memorial for her mother, Ann Jarvis, at St. Andrew's Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia. In stating the rationale for setting aside a day to honor all mothers, Anna Jarvis wrote, "Your mother is the person who has done more for you than anyone else in the world."
  • Some thoughts on Mother's Day.
  • Perhaps the cause of memory loss is trauma. We block out traumatic events from our memory. Like birth, for instance. Imagine being shoved through a PVC pipe with something resembling an alien tentacle protruding from where your bellybutton is supposed to be. Hmm.
  • When it was time to move my twice-widowed father into assisted living, it was also time to close up his home. Closing a home with over fifty years of detritus is a chore and it was my chore. Before and after the inevitable estate sale, items drifted to my house and to my sister’s. And it’s one of those items I want to talk about today.
  • “Fashion fades, only style remains.” So said the woman pictured above, Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel better known as “Coco”(1883-1971). She is the only fashion designer to make Time magazine’s list of most influential people of the 20th Century. She understood what her life’s work was really about. “Fashion is made to become unfashionable.”
  • Sometimes a classic movie is more than just an excellent example of its genre. That is certainly the case for High Noon, the 1952 Western that will be screened and discussed by the Sherman Classic Movie Group on Wednesday evening at 6:00 p.m. in the Covenant Community Center, 322 W. Pecan (the public is invited). The film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, and won four, as well as four Golden Globe Awards. It brought Gary Cooper his second Oscar and his first Golden Globe.
  • For all the concerns raised by economists and others about the House tax plan, it is generally assumed that the proposal will reduce the gaming of the tax system by multinational corporations. Among the more active debates: Will the currency adjust perfectly or will retail prices rise? Is the plan legal under our trade agreements? Do foreign investments take a dive?
  • Just because I can keep up with my age doesn’t mean I know my shelf life. While several Baby Boomer girlfriends were gathered recently, Patsi announced gleefully, “My husband and I just bought our last refrigerator!” We all knew what she meant---"When the roll is called up yonder..."

  • That's John Deere up above. He invented the steel plow that could handle the tough prairie soil of the mid-west and plains. He didn't invent the tractor, but the company he founded became a byword for agricultural equipment. What's is this leading up to? Read and find out.
  • Theories of comedy go back at least as far as the ancient Greeks, and what is regarded as funny has evolved along the way. Recently I saw two films which illustrate some differences between dramatic comedy from the 1940s and the 1960s.