Columnists
  • Tiny Tears was one of the most popular baby dolls of the 50s and early 60s. She was manufactured by American Character Doll Company and was offered in a variety of sizes in the time that she was available. Tiny also went through a couple of style changes over the years, but always retained the one characteristic that made her famous--she cried real tears!
  • Amos said he was not a prophet, but he did speak truth to power and had keen insight into what daily signs meant for suffering people.
  • The Old Farmer's Almanac has been published annually since 1792, making it the oldest continuously published periodical in North America.
  • Membership at the nearby family fitness center has changed more things in my life than my pathetic body. In three months’ time, chlorine in the pool has turned my black swimsuit to the cock-eyed color of heliotrope, and it has caused my silver gray hair to become a subdued shade (and consistency!) of harvested wheat.
  • Recently I read a book that made me reflect on the many ways we rely on animal-related words, phrases and expressions in our everyday conversations and also our literature. Author Boze Hadleigh gave his book a very colorful title: Holy Cow: Doggerel, Catnaps, Scapegoats, Foxtrots and Horsefeathers—Splendid Animal Words and Phrases. His careful detective work brought to my mind dozens of animal terms that I have been using since childhood and he traced their origins.
  • Even as an older adult (Remembering when the operator said, "Number please" qualifies me), I am continuously stumbling upon life-changing morsels of delight.
  • I wasn't troubled with warts during my childhood, but some of my schoolmates were. I can conjure up vivid images of a child’s hand with warts. I also remember childhood discussions about handling toads as a cause for warts. Recently I read a memoir written by Mildred Kalish, who grew up on a farm in Iowa during the 1930s, and in a chapter on home remedies she described several wart-removal remedies that even she admitted sounded like voodoo.
  • When I was growing up, spit was the number one cleaning agent in our house. That was the era of real ingenuity. I even learned how to feed a family of five for more than two weeks from supplies found inside the sofa. That’s in addition to replacing the refrigerator light bulb with a bug zapper.
  • There has been much discussion about tax reform. There are really two different areas of tax reform: federal taxes, and state/local taxes.
  • As far back as I can remember, one of my favorite meals has been a hamburger with French fries, with mustard on the burger and ketchup on the fries. Recently I discovered some interesting history about these foods and the two sauces.
  • My mama was a Rosie the Riveter at Pratt & Whitney aircraft engine manufacturer in Hartford, Connecticut, during World War II when she met my dad. He served as a troop carrier pilot and was attracted to Mama because of her patriotism and the way she talked "planes." After they married and settled in Bonham, Mama, still very much a patriot, began a second career with the Veterans Administration. That's when Veterans Day took on a whole new meaning. It was a federal holiday, and that meant . . . shopping.
  • In more than 25 years of encouraging senior citizens to write their memoirs, the argument I have used most often is this: "The world has changed so much in my lifetime and yours that our grandchildren will have great difficulty understanding the world we grew up in." From time to time I read something in the newspaper that gives new meaning to that argument. Let me illustrate.