Columnists
  • Imagine a cool, spring-fed lake lined with cattails atop a 150-foot bluff of the Red River. Prairie grasses wrap the water, sheltering doves and ground birds. In the pine and oak woods, songbirds regale all day, and owls take flight at night. Nestled next to the lake, 1930s red-brown stone cabins, campsites and a lodge boast epic views. A bike-and-hike trail loops the lake, offering an ambling tour of these wonders. photo courtesy of Allen Rich/North Texas e-News
  • Robin Williams with troops gathered at the Camp Liberty Post Exchange in Baghdad during a USO tour, Dec. 14, 2004. DoD file photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Dan Purcell
  • Cele - photo by Russell A. Graves
  • It's remarkably dark on top of Mount Locke as well it should be. At 6,800 feet above sea level, the air is clear and thin. When I was there in June, the temperatures were brisk. So much so, many of the people sitting in the dark in the broad, outdoor amphitheater wore sweaters or hoodies to insulate themselves against the cool mountain air.
  • A few days ago, I was driving to my son's home in the country. Three types of roads were engaged on my short trek---asphalt, oil, and gravel. During my daydreaming state of mind (I once sat at a red light on the town square and moved forward when the time changed on the bank marquee), and with the only vehicles on my radar being Black Angus cows, I mechanically turned on my blinker when I pulled off the oil road onto the gravel one. I felt silly.
  • This summer, I left Texas and traveled to Wyoming to take my wife and children to America’s first national monument. Deemed a place worthy of protection in 1906, Theodore Roosevelt declared Devil's Tower and surrounding 1,347 acres a monument. photo by Russell A. Graves
  • Although we're infrequent movie-goers, Lanny and I picked a good one last week---Jersey Boys. I wiped the dribble from my chin and fell in love with Lanny all over again.
  • Country living continued... photo by Russell A. Graves
  • The recent and dramatic rise in illegal migration across our border, from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, presents a major challenge to the United States. Particularly because so many of those crossing our border are children, there is also a humanitarian dimension to this problem, which the U.S. Government is bound and determined to respect.
  • One of the joys of crawdads is reconnecting with your past and going crawfishing with kids. photo by Russell A. Graves
  • My brother Tim has lived near some of the prettiest ski resorts in Colorado. Years ago, he said, "Cindy, I want you to come skiing with me."