Farm and Ranch
  • The purple-colored patches on the right side of the fence are signs of invasion of common Bermuda grass into Coastal Bermuda grass pasture under a high stocking rate, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research forage scientist. On the left side of the fence, the stocking rate was medium and shows much less invasion of common ecotypes. The pastures on both side of the fence received nitrogen fertilizer at usual rates during a 30-year study of the effects of stocking rates and nitrogen rates on pastures. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Monte Rouquette)
  • Winter cabbage fields, like this one south of Edinburg, are especially susceptible to bacterial diseases encouraged by cool, damp weather. Onions have also been affected by the wet weather that is predicted to continue through at least May. (AgriLife Extension photo by Rod Santa Ana)
  • Texas' average temperatures have increased about 1.5 degrees since the 1970s, according to the Texas state climatologist. While this may not seem like much of an increase to most people, it's enough to increase the evapotranspiration of plants and loss of surface water by several percent, making droughts more severe. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon)
  • Beef with reasonable marbling and juicy taste is preferred among consumers, and industry leaders continue to monitor how to consistently produce a product with these traits. A recent research article addresses the biology and biochemistry of beef marbling and its effects on production systems, carcass and fat quality.
  • Vicente Fox, past president of Mexico, to be keynote speaker

  • Results of sale Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 867 head sold.
  • Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.7 million head on March 1, 2015. The inventory was 1 percent below March 1, 2014.
  • Dr. Mark Welch, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service grains economist, suggests farmers watch the cash market and also monitor the basis price to take advantage of profit opportunities in 2015. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)
  • Vineyard managers who are battling insects, weeds and diseases may attend the Vineyard Pest Management Workshop March 27 in McKinney, according to Dr. Justin Scheiner, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service viticulturist from College Station.
  • Many areas in East Texas have received so much rain in the last month that tractors and trucks can become bogged down to the axles in what is normally firm, well-drained land, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent reports. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Robert Burns)
  • "We want to make sure that farm program payments are going to the farmers and farm families that they are intended to help. So we’ve taken the steps to do that, to the extent that the Farm Bill allows," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "The Farm Bill gave USDA the authority to limit farm program payments to individuals who are not actively engaged in the management of the farming operation on non-family farms. This helps close a loophole that has been taken advantage of by some larger joint ventures and general partnerships."
  • The increasing global commerce and relative ease of movement across nations and continents makes it possible to transfer people, products and animals around the world in a matter of hours. Such international movement greatly enhances the possibility of transmitting diseases and parasites, which could devastate the cattle industry and threaten the public health of this country.